CALENDAR

 

Our meeting place is in the East Torrance Soil and Water Conservation District’s education building located a block north of Hwy 55 at 700 S. 10th Street.

OUR USUAL MEETING PLACE

TCAS 2018

On Tuesday, October 2nd, our Meeting will be held at our usual meeting place in Estancia.


Our speaker will be:  Laura Steele. The title of Laura’s presentation is:    Defining Cultural Spaces Through the Analysis of Animal Bones: The Case Study of Sapa’owingeh (Sapawe LA 306)”

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Meaning is assigned to spaces by the individuals who inhabit them. Individuals give spaces meaning many different ways, including through the placement of objects. This research focuses on the use of kivas and rooms at the largest Classic period site in the Southwest: the ancestral Tewa site, Sapa’owingeh, LA 306 (Sapawe). Using ethno-historical data and zooarchaeological techniques to explore and better define the roles of mammalian and avian fauna, this research highlights the use of turkeys and the possible development of moieties at Sapawe. Because kivas and rooms are generally assumed by archaeologists to have different functions, they were tested by comparing faunal data. The data gathered for this research implies perhaps kivas are representative of summer and winter moieties at Sapawe and reshapes our current understanding of the use of specific animals across the Southwest. This line of evidence opens the door for larger archaeological discussions regarding the use of space prehistorically and can help us understand broad-ranging patterns cross-culturally.

Laura “Kiki” Ward Steele was born in the Mojave Desert of southern California. She received her Bachelor’s of Science from the California Polytechnic University of Pomona in anthropology and her Master’s from Eastern New Mexico University in Portales, New Mexico, also in anthropology and applied archaeology. She is currently a PhD student at the University of New Mexico (UNM), in Albuquerque. She studies animal bones (zooarchaeological analysis) under Dr. Emily L. Jones. For her master’s degree, Laura conducted zooarchaeological analysis to identify dietary changes in the pre-Hispanic New Mexican community of Sapa’owingeh (Sapawe) during a transitional period (1350 - 1550 AD). Laura has continued on at UNM broadening her research interests to connect human-environment interactions to the relationship between cultural centers and hinterlands. Recently, she has switched her geographical focus to South America. Central western Argentina marks a frontier between large sedentary communities and mobile Indigenous groups and at UNM, she has been able to expand her zooarchaeological skills while also working with the Center for Stable Isotopes (CSI) to develop skills in analyzing animal bones isotopically, a useful method in understanding human-environment interactions. Laura is also a third year Hibben Fellow at UNM and the editorial manager for the journal of Museum Anthropology.

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TCAS 2018

On Tuesday, November 13th, our Meeting will be held at our usual meeting place in Estancia.  This will be our final meeting of the season and will include a catered dinner and a special speaker.


Our speaker will be:  Dr. Bruce Huckell The title of Dr. Huckell’s presentation is:    NA